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Spring 2016 BaiYe Osmanthus Aroma Dancong Oolong Tea

Spring 2016 BaiYe Osmanthus Aroma Dancong Oolong Tea

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Description

I have 450g of Spring 2016 osmanthus aroma dancong for sale. This tea is supposedly from old BaiYe (white leaf) bushes. This is quite a nice dancong with a lovely osmanthus aroma, along with other, more subtle notes. The flavor lasts from beginning to end and you never have to look for it, but it is balanced and never excessive. There are also some mint-like notes I noticed with my last session, when I brewed this tea with less leaf in porcelain (a 60ml gaiwan).

There is tolerable bitterness in the first infusion, but this dissipates quickly when brewing with a moderate amount of leaf. I gongfu brew this tea a few different ways: with a stuffed 60ml gaiwan, in a stuffed Chaozhou clay pot and with less leaf in a gaiwan as well. All three methods work, with my preference being a moderate amount of tea in porcelain and a larger amount of tea in clay. I use boiling water for each infusion, after preheating the gaiwan or pot with boiling water and doing a rinse with water off the boil. With large amounts of leaf, I use flash infusions several times until the flavor starts to drop off, and then I extend the infusions to ten seconds, fifteen seconds, and longer. This tea has great longevity and will continue to provide flavorful infusions for a long time while still giving lots of aroma and flavor!

When brewed strong in porcelain, I got a lovely ripe peach aroma from the wet leaves and in the cup, along with osmanthus and orchid, which is very enticing. There were also almond-like notes in later infusions that were pleasant and surprising. Almond is often a characteristic flavor in good Wuyi oolongs, and occasionally in dancong too, apparently! When brewed lighter, this peach aroma is much lighter, but the osmanthus note is lovely. There is pronounced huigan (returning sweetness after the swallow) in the second infusion onwards. This sweetness ebbs and flows between infusions. When brewed strong in a gaiwan, the huigan hit me five minutes after the third infusion, and lingered for a good, long while, along with the osmanthus flavor.

I feel this dancong is much better than my previous 2013 dancong, which was very popular and sold out quite quickly.

This dancong is moderately roasted, but this level is considered a high roast in Chaozhou today. 

I have previously had great results brewing dancong with a technique that Imen, a California vendor who specializes in dancong, suggested (2g per 100ml for two minutes). I got some interesting complexity brewing that way in Chaozhou clay that I hadn't found with flash infusions, so if you want to try that method, you might get lovely results. 

This tea is HK$188 for 50g. I have a vacuum sealer and as with all of my loose teas, I will seal the tea in a fresh mylar bag (carefully vacuum sealed so as not to crush the delicate leaves), before wrapping the tea in bubble wrap and packing it up in a fresh box. I also provide sealing rods to keep your oolong tea airtight between uses!

Please note: most traditional Hong Kong tea merchants do not offer discounts on volume until I am purchasing several kilograms at a time, and in some cases, no discounts are offered at all, even for ten kilos of a single tea or more. For this reason, I cannot offer a discount on larger purchases at this time.

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