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2012 HK Home Storage China Tea Fu Zhuan Raw Brick Tea (50g)

2012 HK Home Storage China Tea Fu Zhuan Raw Brick Tea (50g)

FREE EC-Ship / ePacket shipping for orders over US$139/HK$1088 to select countries on order

HK$150.00
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Description

2012 was the year when I started really getting into tea here in Hong Kong. This brick was the first brick of tea I ever purchased; there was some discussion of fu zhuan cha on Teachat, and the eurotium cristatum (or golden flower fungus) in the tea made it sound very interesting!

Fu bricks are known for a healthy layer of golden flowers, or jin hua, that grow on the tea. Down here in Hong Kong, this fungus is sometimes found on traditionally stored pu erh. What I didn't know at the time was that fu tea from Hunan is often innoculated with a flour-like starter that helps get the fungus going! 


This China Tea brick is of much higher quality than most fu tea offerings on the market, but prices can get sky high for premium material. In 2012, there was already a market for premium fu tea, which in retrospect is quite surprising. The market has since heated up considerably, and the variety of premium fu tea offerings is now muchg greater!

When young, this tea had an interesting flavor, but I could also taste a flour-like note. The golden flowers bloomed every summer and died back every winter with the seasons. For the last two years, however, I haven't seen any active golden flowers. I believe the substrate no longer contains enough flour or naturally occuring tea carbohydrates to maintain a golden flower colony. The tea is, however, extremely smooth, and has been miraculously transformed in the time I've had this tea! It is incredibly smooth. When pushed hard, there is almost no astringency and bitterness. This tea is nice an slippery and easy to drink, with distinctive fu cha flavor that is now mellowed, along with some aged notes that are reminiscent of aged oolong or sheng pu erh (old book notes). 

This is an incredible tea now, and drinking this tea takes me right back to 2012. Interestingly when trying the tea today, for the first time in 2019, I used the same Chaozhou porcelain teapot and fair pitcher I used back in 2012! This basic teaware has served me well over the years, but the tea (and I) have changed dramatically with the years.

I'm offering up ten 50g portions of this tea! I can't find this brick anywhere, and I'm pretty certain you won't find a Hong Kong home-stored version of this brick for sale anywhere else!

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